chronophotography

agrion-h.gifChronophotography is the name tienne-Jules Marey (1882) used to describe the time (chronos) photographs of movement sequences. According to Chronophotographical Projections. This is a fascinating site, found by following a thread on Meta-filter about pictures of bullets frozen in time to this link posted by Ray Girvan. This site has an amazing collection of animations on it. The site was made by, I think, C. Lucassen (it's hard to find, let alone read, the website creator's signature!) Some pages are difficult to read even if they are gorgeous -- just stick with it. The illustration in this entry is a low-res version of a very fine gif animation by the site author illustrating an entry about Lucien Bull. (Oh, I could spend a long time on this site ... alas, I need to pay the bills.)
Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/10/02 at 06:04 AM
  1. Why is it that people think they can post anything they like without even asking for permission. Is everything in the public domain just because you can see it? This is why I removed the website you described. Please remove the animation from this weblog!!

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  07/25  at  05:41 AM
  2. What is your problem? The image you object to was posted in December 2002—and you’re only now stumbling upon it? 

    An example of what is on your site is fair use—it is a review. And a good review, at that.

    If you didn’t want to share your findings with the world, why did you post anything at all?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  07/25  at  05:51 AM
  3. Presenting my work in a website is not posting. But you think that is posting. I have never had any problems with people saving the animations on their hard drives. I do object to presenting them on the web as you did. I never asked for a review, never gave you permission for the presentation of an animation and have never heard of the “fair use” clause you are refering to.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  07/25  at  03:52 PM
  4. You published your work on a publicly available website. It is not a requirement that you ask for a review to have something you PUBLISHED be reviewed. Here is a link to the “Fair Use” clause of the Berne Convention governing the protection of literary and artistic works Article 10. You might want to take a look at the whole agreement—it’s been the governing policy of international copyright law for, oh, 35 years or so ...

    Why do you have such a bug up your ass about this, anyway?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  07/25  at  04:57 PM
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